House

 (1,394)
8.72006X-Ray13+
House will do whatever it takes to solve a case before it's too late, from sending one of his team to break into a patient's home in search of clues, to attempting a controversial, trial-and-error form of treatment to see how a patient responds. House's methods may be suspect, but his results are not - he saves lives no one else can.
Starring
Omar EppsJennifer MorrisonJesse Spencer
Genres
DramaSuspense
Subtitles
English [CC]
Audio languages
EnglishEnglish [Audio Description]

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  1. 1. Acceptance
    September 12, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House makes a trip to Death Row and Stacy returns to the hospital.
  2. 2. Autopsy
    September 19, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    A girl's unimaginable bravery toward her terminal illness makes House suspicious as he puts a life-or-death decision about her case in her young hands.
  3. 3. Humpty Dumpty
    September 26, 2005
    43min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    Cuddy struggles with a case of guilt when her handyman is injured while at her place, and House and his team have to work fast to save the young man's pursuit of the American Dream.
  4. 4. TB Or Not TB
    October 31, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House's patient is willing to die in order to further his social cause.
  5. 5. Daddy's Boy
    November 7, 2005
    43min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    Lies between a father and son may prevent House and his team from saving their patient.
  6. 6. Spin
    November 14, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House's wheels start turning when a pro-cyclist admits to taking performance-enhancing drugs.
  7. 7. Hunting
    November 21, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    A patient with AIDS stalks House to get him to take his case; House and Stacy stalk a mouse in her attic; and Cameron faces a health scare of her own.
  8. 8. The Mistake
    November 28, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    A patient's death prompts an investigation into whether Chase or House may have been responsible for her death.
  9. 9. Deception
    December 12, 2005
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House and the team must decipher whether a patient who has cried wolf too many times now has a deadly illness.
  10. 10. Failure to Communicate
    January 9, 2006
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    A journalist's head injury results in unintelligible speech, leaving House and his team at a loss; and the heat is turned up between House and Stacy when they're out of town.
  11. 11. Need to Know
    February 6, 2006
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    A young mother on fertility medication reminds House and the team that everybody lies; House and Stacy rekindle their relationship.
  12. 12. Distractions
    February 13, 2006
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House and his team resort to unusual diagnostic methods to treat a young man with extremely severe burns and House strikes back at a former med school colleague.
  13. 13. Skin Deep
    February 19, 2006
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House and his team treat a young model for a drug addiction but discover shocking surprises about her in the process.
  14. 14. Sex Kills
    March 6, 2006
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House and his team race against the clock to diagnose a dead woman in order to save a dying man.
  15. 15. Clueless
    March 27, 2006
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    When House and his team race against the clock to diagnose the source of a man's illness, the clues point to a shocking suspect.
  16. 16. Safe
    April 4, 2006
    43min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    A teenage heart transplant patient is rushed to the hospital when she has an allergic reaction while living in a "clean" room, and House and Wilson work out the kinks of their new living arrangement.
  17. 17. All In
    April 10, 2006
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House and the team race to prevent a young boy from suffering the same fate as a former patient with identical symptoms who lost her life.
  18. 18. Sleeping Dogs Lie
    April 17, 2006
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    When a patient needs a liver transplant to give House and the team more time to solve the case, an ethical dilemma arises that may eliminate the patient's chance of survival.
  19. 19. House vs. God
    April 24, 2006
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    A teenage faith healer challenges House and the team's beliefs about faith and God and whether either has a physical effect on a patient's condition.
  20. 20. Euphoria; Part 1
    May 1, 2006
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English
    A wounded police officer with uncontrollable laughter has House and the team baffled; when Foreman starts showing the same symptoms and the officer's illness takes a fatal turn, they must race to figure out the cause before it's too late to save Foreman's life.
  21. 21. Euphoria; Part 2
    May 2, 2006
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    Foreman faces his own mortality as House and the team struggle to figure out how to stop the progression of his deadly illness.
  22. 22. Forever
    May 8, 2006
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House and the team take on two cases at once when they attempt to save the lives of a young mother and her newborn son.
  23. 23. Who's Your Daddy?
    May 15, 2006
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House and the team take on the case of a hurricane Katrina victim and Cuddy searches for a sperm donor.
  24. 24. No Reason
    May 23, 2006
    44min
    TV-14
    Subtitles
    English [CC]
    Audio languages
    English, English [Audio Description]
    House is shot by a former patient and must share a recovery room with the gunman.

More details

Directors
Greg YaitanesDeran SarafianDavid StraitonDaniel AttiasDaniel SackheimMiguel SapochnikDavid PlattMatt ShakmanJuan José CampanellaKatie Jacobs
Season year
2006
Network
David Shore
Content advisory
Substance usealcohol usefoul languagesexual contentviolencefrightening scenes
Purchase rights
Stream instantly Details
Format
Prime Video (streaming online video)
Devices
Available to watch on supported devices

Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars

1394 global ratings

  1. 87% of reviews have 5 stars
  2. 9% of reviews have 4 stars
  3. 2% of reviews have 3 stars
  4. 1% of reviews have 2 stars
  5. 1% of reviews have 1 stars
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Top reviews from the United States

RayReviewed in the United States on February 24, 2010
5.0 out of 5 stars
Is There a Doctor in the House? You Bet!
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What can be said about a series that must certainly be ranked as one of the most compelling to have ever appeared on television? It is easy to view the slew of awards that "House, M.D." has been nominated for (and won), to recall the litany of accolades the show has garnered from news, entertainment, and magazine critics, and even to review the endless series of online postings concerning the show (like this very one, here, on Amazon), and conclude that, "Yes, "House, M.D." is probably a good show." But in fact, "House, M.D." is more than a good show. For many viewers, the series is easily one of the most fascinating and unusual to have ever been aired on television. Moreover, and dare I say it, the series will likely eventually be ranked amongst the top television shows ever produced on network television.

But before I say any more about "House, M.D.," let me briefly for the reader summarize the show. "House, M.D." is a medical drama that takes place at a fictional teaching hospital ("Princeton-Plainsborough Hospital"). The story revolves around a particular doctor, Dr. Gregory House, an individual who has established himself as a medical genius able to solve difficult medical mysteries that other doctors have been unable to solve. Dr. House works with a small group of internists who are serving in residence under him, and who, despite their much less experience, actively work with House to solve medical problems through a technique called a "Differential Diagnosis," a kind of group-based brainstorming session where diagnostic ideas are presented, written on a white board, and systematically eliminated by comparing each hypothesis with the ongoing list of patient symptoms. But Dr. House is more than just a diagnostic genius: he possesses a debilitating leg injury that keeps him in perpetual pain, and he regularly uses powerful prescription painkillers to the point where there is genuine concern that he may, in fact, be a pain medicine addict. But there's more. Along with his genius, House has an incredibly insensitive and offensive demeanor, and seemingly has no concern for social norms, courtesies, or sometimes, even common decency. His unparalleled genius at helping patients is probably what keeps him employed in spite of his incredibly ongoing offensive behavior.

What makes this show so compelling, so unique, and so interesting? There is probably no one answer to this question. At the core of it is likely House himself, a character who is fundamentally a contradiction, a walking incongruity, a person that we desperately and increasingly wish to understand, and perhaps, even wish to control to correct his unacceptable behavior. We find ourselves watching this man and so strongly wishing that we can figure him out, to come to a true understanding and belief about him, to solve the mystery of who he really is, and by that knowledge, settle the manifold open questions surrounding him and his relationships to others that each episode more fully presents.

Unfortunately, or should I rather say, "fortunately," such an understanding is not easily developed. The complexities, ambiguities, and open questions surrounding the character of House come tantalizingly close to being solved time after time, only to be later shown that what we thought was the answer to this man was really just another false lead, another misunderstanding, another fact to add into this increasingly difficult puzzle. Part of the show's allure is this ongoing dissonance, not only between House and his coworkers, but deeply within House himself. Is he truly an uncaring person? Is he truly a person who views his entire medical career as simply a series of puzzles to be solved, and where people who recover are simply a side effect of the solved puzzle? Does he really look at every social, religious, or ethnic factor as a legitimate target of derision? Is he truly hostile to people's religious convictions? Does he truly believe that his drug addiction is an irrelevant issue to his work? Each episode faces us with House's reaction to these questions to varying degrees, and over time, we may find that we build an increasing understanding of this man, but we often find those understandings torn apart in a later episode, where new observations on House make us rethink what we think we knew.

In spite of House's problems and deficiencies, we often find him an imminently likeable character, and we often see hints of goodness in him that he desperately tries to keep hidden from others. Often, it is hinted in the subtilest of ways that House himself wishes to hide from others the fact that he truly does care, but this hint is just as quickly dashed as we witness his next immature toy kicking. (It can sometimes seem that House is more of a four year old in a nursery who is testing his fellow nursery members for territorial markers. In other cases, he is the genius child who seeks to use others as fodder for his most recent theories on human and animal behavior.)

"House, M.D.," if the truth be known, does not start out in Season One as a soap opera, but by Season Five for the series run, I think a defensible case can be made that the show takes on many of the trappings of a soap opera, curiously and ironically enough, mirroring the very soap operas that the character House in the show is seen so frequently watching (often, on an old, 1990's style portable television located in his office). This morphing into the arena of the soap opera doesn't really matter, though, for the viewer who has gone through the entire set of previous episodes in order. With no attempt to defend this shift in style, the show uses its first three seasons to genuinely establish itself as a puzzle solving, medical mystery show, with House serving as a medical Sherlock Holmes (sans the hat and the pipe, but plus the strange personality and temperament issues), and the stories are easily carried with each individual episode standing as a mental gymnastic exercise that keeps the viewer wanting more. But strewn through these episodes are myriads of strange, and often, very awkward character interactions that are left unfinished and unexplored, tantalizing us with seeming keys to unlock the mystery of House. It is perhaps inevitable that a show lasting so many years (now in its sixth season) and having such strong characters and unusual trappings would be inevitably drawn to revisit and examine such unfinished business. These "explorations" begin to occur more repeatedly in Season Four, and by Season Five, we see the exaggeration of much of this at the expense of series' original, focal point of medical mysteries to be resolved, which by this point in the series often take back seat to the ever growing personal dramas. But even this doesn't matter. The issues and themes explored in Season Five, while taking on the feeling of a soap opera, are still handled with great expertise and generally fascinating ways, so that we still find ourselves focused on each event, all the time still (unconsciously at times, I must admit) wishing that we can figure House out, get the mystery of House solved, and have some type of a resolution that fits our conception of the real world. By the end of Season Five, we still do not have an answer for this dilemma, and the show uses this dilemma to hold the audience's attention in a powerful manner.

The basic premise of the show is so startling unique and fascinating in its own right that the show does not need to rely on cheap "shock" tricks to maintain attention. It is true that there are a number of "shocking" events to occur through the series, and there can be no doubt that the show, being first and foremost a network based television format production, employs "cliffhangers" to hold the viewer through the regular commercial breaks, but it is amazing to see how the show is regularly worked into individual episodes that are artfully crafted into stories that flow, and work, from beginning to end.

Quite some time ago, I wrote a long review for "The Rockford Files," a television show in the 1970's that, in my own thinking, achieved the status as being one of the best television shows ever produced. I had written my review at a time when the first "Rockford Files" DVD's were being released, and the opportunity to re-watch these shows reminded me again of the superior writing, the acting, and the impressive interworking of the cast which made this show, not just a cut above the average television show, but a true classic, one that could almost not be challenged in the realm of television. I still feel that way about The Rockford Files, and, truth be known, another very different show from a decade earlier, "The Dick Van Dyke Show," had many of these same characteristics, all coalescing to make what eventual became in both cases a classic production. "The Rockford Files" and "The Dick Van Dyke Show" reached such pinnacles of performance that they remain examples of the very best television ever made, and even the ravages of 30 and 40 years of time have done little but solidify that achievement.

"House, M.D." is, in my opinion, is likely destined for that same level of accolade. In the show, we find that same coalescing of features - a truly unique character creation, excellent writing, and a cast that works well together - that will argue for the show's inclusion in that highest level of ranking. But whether that specific claim turns out to be true or not, the fact remains that House, M.D. is one of the most fascinating, intriguing, and enjoyable shows to watch. We witness medical problems and the difficult procedure in diagnosing and treating those problems; we witness the struggles, oddities, and offensiveness (and yes, there are many parts of the show that are incredibly offensive) of a main character who remains both a genius and an enigma, an inscrutable person who is endlessly fascinating to behold; we witness a cast of actors who must earn to interact with the powerful character of House while establishing their own credibility; and finally, but not least of all, we enjoy Hugh Laurie's incredible rendition of the House character. Add these factors up, and you end up with one heck of a fascinating show. I'll say it in conclusion again, that this is one of the best television shows to have appeared in years, and Hugh Laurie is superb in his role as House. You can enjoy it even more on DVD, where there are no commercial interruptions. I rate this as five stars, but the real truth is that it is one BIG star (House) with four other stars with him. Well, make that seven or eight other stars, depending on the season you are currently watching.
3 people found this helpful
Christina L.Reviewed in the United States on June 8, 2022
5.0 out of 5 stars
Glad to almost have the whole collection because I love house
Verified purchase
Nothing
Matt KratzReviewed in the United States on December 4, 2021
4.0 out of 5 stars
Good show
Verified purchase
I was glad I got this, as House is such a wonderful character. If you like House, you will love this set!
One person found this helpful
KRGReviewed in the United States on June 16, 2007
5.0 out of 5 stars
Hot House!
Verified purchase
Mea culpa. I'll admit it. I happened upon House mid-second season. Little did I know within a year I'd be hooked, desperate for my weekly fix of the wickedly attractive yet insanely abrupt!

Who needs mind-altering drugs when the creative symbiosis of David Shore/Bryan Singer/Katie Jacobs and the rest of their mojo-magic crew sets lovably perverse genius Hugh Laurie loose opposite affably earnest Robert Sean Leonard to do what only they can do?

Um, taut innuendos, anyone? Unlike some TV actors who can't even eat a sandwich sans cue cards, the talented duo's bickering camaraderie scarfs up the subtext of both female and male dreams. House/Wilson is Greek theater being played out by the American Medical Association's Monty Python Repertory company atop a world stage while perched precariously upon a high wire. With no net, yet. Bravo.

Even though Fox reruns their reruns and USA, too, it's looking like a long, hot, steamy summer until The Boys & Co. are back in town.

Wheww[...]

Until then, I am happy to write The House Blogs! AND House-sit Seasons 1 and 2, for there is a there that is destination worthy until the arrival of the medical narrative's Season 3 on DVD, due out in late August. For in a spectacle to savor when last we saw the low GQ-high IQ Dr. Gregory House, he was running his long lithe fingertips oh-so-gently about the sleek glossy curves of his new musically acoustic lover, virtually about to pluck her into ecstasy, and therein lies my other "problem" with this unquestionably brilliant show:

Gulp. I like this man far, far too much.

Flip this House? No way!
11 people found this helpful
JensenReviewed in the United States on December 17, 2021
5.0 out of 5 stars
DvD case was broke, appears the disc are okay the case broken.
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Everything seemed fine disc okay just the case had been busted.
Robert I. HedgesReviewed in the United States on January 4, 2008
5.0 out of 5 stars
"Cheese Is The Devil's Plaything."
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"House" is a perfect television show, and is, in my opinion, the only dramatic show currently in production that's worth watching. The show, centered on the acerbic, thoroughly disagreeable, and utterly brilliant Dr. Gregory House, is well written, intelligently directed, and perfectly acted. Hugh Laurie as House deservedly gets the lion's share of the plaudits for the show, but the remaining cast is equally brilliant in their vital supporting roles. Omar Epps, Jennifer Morrison, and Jesse Spencer deserve special mention for playing the young and impressionable doctors putting up with House's eccentricities, but my favorite of the supporting cast is Robert Sean Leonard as oncologist Dr. James Wilson. Leonard's portrayal is both funny and poignant, as are the lines crafted for him by the excellent screenwriters.

There are several plotlines in this season, most significantly the reappearance of ex-girlfriend Stacy, played by Sela Ward, in House's life. If I had only one thing to change about season two, it would be to take a bit less time for the Stacy subplot, which, for me, was stretched beyond its usefulness. There are many excellent episodes, and many interesting guest stars including LL Cool J, Ron Livingston, Cynthia Nixon, and Michelle Trachtenberg.

The DVD set includes many extras including a "House" documentary, a blooper reel, and producer commentaries: I found them all enjoyable.

Prime time television simply does not get any better than this: I highly recommend this season of "House," but urge you to do the sensible thing and buy all the seasons at once. Yes, they're that good.
6 people found this helpful
dsdibbleyReviewed in the United States on June 14, 2006
5.0 out of 5 stars
Superb Season 2 of House
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After having seen Hugh Laurie in shows such as Black Adder (in which is absolutely hysterical) and movies (Sense and Sensibility and Peter's Friends), anything he is in had to be terrific. So when the trailers for the first season started playing and Hugh Laurie was going to star in it, I knew I had to watch it. I wasn't disappointed and couldn't wait for Season 2 to start this past January. I am glad they will be starting Season 3 on September 5th rather than mid season. Season 2 picked up the story line following the relationship between House and the return of Stacy that was the bombshell of Season 1. I was glad there was resolution of sorts, and was also glad it happened early in the season. House has to be House without distractions; it is what makes us love him. There is a reason why House scored consistantly in the Nielsen top 10 this past season; it is because it is a terrific show that doesn't have to constantly show gore to get the point across. All the characters are intertwined and the dynamics of their relationships and how they relate to each other and their patients is what carries the show's points across. Anyone who likes a show that is fast paced and intellectually sound should watch this show and own it on DVD so it can be enjoyed over and over.
14 people found this helpful
S. KassebaumReviewed in the United States on November 6, 2006
5.0 out of 5 stars
House Season 2 -- Exceptional TV
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Very cutting-edge drama with an outstanding cast. Not your typical medical drama. House is one of those series where you have a love-hate relationship with the main character... a lot like Archie Bunker, where you might think the things House says, but you would never treat people the way he does -- but you might want to! And you end up caring about each character... especially surprising when you feel that you are just getting to hate one! The plots are fantastically complex medical diagnosis with enough intrigue to leave you baffled at how many times a doctor can get something wrong; but still end up saving the person's life in a fashion of miraculous discovery... and Hugh Laurie is exquisite when he "gets it"! Amazing tension in the show is created because you know that House will eventually get it right -- saving the patient when no one else can, but he makes many wrong turns along the way... a lot like his life. This series will leave you hanging on the edge of your seat and praising the makers of VHS & DVD that you don't have to wait thru the commercial!! I stopped watching it during the regular season because the commercials were causing too much anxiety! Sit back with some popcorn and enjoy... I'll bet you can't watch just one episode!
2 people found this helpful
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