Time Team HD

 (21)
2004ALL
Tony Robinson and the Time Team are back for their 11th series of archaeology digs. Archaeology isn't just about digging up the mysterious remains of the long dead. It can reveal how we used to live in amazing detail. In this season, the team faces many mysteries, including unidentifiable buildings, stone structures hidden underwater, and an Roman Fort that no one can seem to find.
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  1. 1. In Search of the Brigittine Abbey
    This video is currently unavailable
    January 4, 2004
    49min
    ALL
    The Time Team is on the trail of a medieval mystery. Founded by Henry V and built by his son Henry VI, Syon Abbey was a large, wealthy monastery for nuns of an obscure Swedish order. During the reign of Henry VIII, it vanished... until now. What the team finds is on a huge scale, but there is disagreement as to what kind of building it was. It will take a deeper look to come to a conclusion.
  2. 2. The Crannog in the Loch
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    January 18, 2004
    48min
    ALL
    There's a round island of stones in Loch Migdale. Could it be a crannog? 200 meters away, on the banks, is a small circular feature, a henge perhaps? The Time Team gathers experts on the prehistoric in order to find out. They set up a suction dredge to investigate two areas of the loch feature, and find wonderfully preserved timber. From there, it is easy for the team to deduce the structure!
  3. 3. Saxon Burials on the Ridge
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    January 25, 2004
    49min
    ALL
    The Time Team investigates a possible 5th century cemetery in a plowed field, where they find a metal shield boss. One male skeleton is holding a drinking vessel. There are hints of much earlier activity as well, including a Bronze Age barrow. Using authentic tools, they fashion a Saxon shield, and then demonstrate how the shields were most effectively used in battle.
  4. 4. The Roman Fort That Wasn't There
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    February 1, 2004
    49min
    ALL
    Nobody knows what happened immediately after the Romans arrived in 43 AD because no Roman fort has been discovered in this part of Southeast England. The Time Team is on a mission to find the missing link. Local archaeologist Paul Wilkinson believes he has already found a military ditch, which would surround such a fort, however, geophysics cannot find any evidence of the ditch.
  5. 5. An Iron Age Trading Center
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    February 8, 2004
    49min
    ALL
    Green Island in Poole Harbour has already shown that it was a significant center of Iron Age activity, with evidence of industrial advancement and trading to and from the continental mainland. The Time Team has their hands full as the island is a Site of Special Scientific Interest, meaning they can only dig by hand. Not soon after they begin, the finds start to multiply.
  6. 6. A Medieval Blast Furnace
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    February 7, 2004
    49min
    ALL
    The Time Team is revisiting the garden of Furnace Cottage in Churnet Valley, where the previous excavation of an Elizabethan blast furnace produced evidence of much earlier iron-making. Stewart surveys the landscape, to piece together a picture of water flow and other features essential to iron smelting. John is convinced that there is strong geophysical evidence for a furnace a mile away.
  7. 7. Rescuing a Mesolithic Foreshore
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    February 22, 2004
    48min
    ALL
    When the tide recedes on the Severn estuary, rare evidence of stone age activity is uncovered. The Time Team is on a three-day mission to help recover some of these relics before they are washed away. The Mesolithic period is poorly understood, because these people were mobile hunter-gatherers who did not build permanent structures. Phil finds the tooth of an aurochs, an extinct giant animal.
  8. 8. Fertile Soils, Rich Archaeology
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    February 29, 2004
    49min
    ALL
    The British landscape is littered with Iron Age hill forts. A local archaeology unit is excavating such a hill fort in Oxfordshire, but cannot afford to investigate a neighboring hill only 200 meters away, which is much larger and more enticing. Both Roman and Iron Age remains have been found there in the past. Can the Time Team help them out with their dilemma? It would be a win for all!
  9. 9. King Cnut's Manor
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    March 7, 2004
    49min
    ALL
    Digging up fields and car parks and back gardens is all very well, but how could the Time Team pass up a chance to dig up a living room? The manor house in Nassington was purchased in a derelict state, and while restoring it, several massive post holes were investigated that seem to be of a size and spacing to have supported the structure of a Saxon Great Hall.
  10. 10. Back-Garden Archaeology: Revisiting a Roman Villa
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    March 14, 2004
    49min
    ALL
    As renowned Suffolk archaeologist Basil Brown discovered, Castle Hill near Ipswich is named not after a castle, but a substantial Roman villa. Brown was unable to complete his excavation, so the Time Team has been called in by local schoolchildren to find out more. They will need to dig up a few back gardens to do so, and soon it becomes clear that Brown's measurements were out of kilter.
  11. 11. The Lost City of Roxburgh
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    March 21, 2004
    49min
    ALL
    A succession of kings held court at Old Roxburgh, or Rokesburg as it was then called, and the Royal burgh by the banks of the Tweed became the largest wool trading center in Europe. Rokesburg competed with Edinburgh, Stirling, and Berwick as the kingdom's most influential place, but while the other three settlements survived, almost nothing remains of Old Roxburgh above ground level.
  12. 12. Brimming with Remains
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    March 26, 2004
    49min
    ALL
    Pigs rooting in a windswept field in Dorset unearthed ancient fragments of Roman mosaic floor tiles. In addition, a Bournemouth University excavation team located some burials nearby. The farmer, Simon Meaden, has asked the Time Team to investigate further. John's geophysics survey reveals a lot of activity, and soon, multiple finds start appearing. Tony is even allowed to dig up a small beaker.

More details

Directors
Laurence VulliamyChloé SolomonMel MorpethStephen WarburtonGraham DixonNick MetcalfePatrick McGradyMichael DouglasAmanda FidlerSimon Raikes
Season year
2004
Network
MagellanTV
Purchase rights
Stream instantly Details
Format
Prime Video (streaming online video)
Devices
Available to watch on supported devices

Other formats

Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

21 global ratings

  1. 51% of reviews have 5 stars
  2. 16% of reviews have 4 stars
  3. 16% of reviews have 3 stars
  4. 0% of reviews have 2 stars
  5. 16% of reviews have 1 stars
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Top reviews from the United States

HutsonReviewed in the United States on August 5, 2022
5.0 out of 5 stars
Best time team. Absolute chemistry
A big bowl of knowledge and entertainment
BuddyReviewed in the United States on January 14, 2022
5.0 out of 5 stars
Awesome Show
If others giving this show a poor review knew anything about the show they'd know that 3 days works well for discovering what they need to know. And as for using a 'power shovel' (someone who obviously doesn't know to call it a backhoe) they do that to get through the topsoil and down to the archeology. Also, IMDB has commercials. Time Team originally aired on Channel 4 in the UK, which is commercial TV, and they had commercials. Those whining about this are either too young or too spoiled (or both) to remember TV with tons of commercials. Gave me time to go pee, frankly. And they complain about a show that is FREE with you're Prime Membership. Did you catch that? FREE! Watch the show and enjoy. And pee during the commercials.
Mike ChristieReviewed in the United States on July 26, 2021
4.0 out of 5 stars
Has ads even if you pay for it
The show is great and I strongly recommend it but I can't give it five stars because of the way Amazon sell it. It's free if you watch it with ads, which I didn't want, so I paid $1.99 for the first episode -- and the ads showed up anyway.

If you love archaeology this is a terrific series, but if like me you hate watching ads, find another way to watch it.
Brian T. ApplegateReviewed in the United States on August 28, 2021
3.0 out of 5 stars
Entertaining
By the later seasons they'd given up doing hard, critical work and just provided a bit of entertainment. In early seasons they'd often argue over what could be inferred given the limited information they'd gotten in a very short dig. Still, I enjoyed the locations and the history if not the archeology.
Jeffrey W AltierReviewed in the United States on February 15, 2021
5.0 out of 5 stars
Great find if you take the time
Full disclosure--my daughter is an archaeologist, so I'm a bit prejudiced in liking the show. The conceit is simple, they have three days to dig at a site. This is good and bad. They are often hindered by the constraints of time, but it is also very factual in that many digs are small time affairs that are limited with resources and funding. It also makes for a more suspenseful episode. It IS television, after all. Tony Robinson is the engaging everyman host of the show. The archaeologists are all legit and experts in their fields. Papers have been published with some of their finds. These are real people, not prettied up celebs chosen simply because they look good. Watch especially for the field workers who get little or no real screen time. They do the grunt work, but often make the real finds. And watch for the little things that show you what this field is really like. Notice nobody enters a site without the express permission of the main leader of that pit/dig. That is to prevent accidently stepping on something that may not be visible or is actively being worked. And notice how the give and take is done with respect for the specialty of the person involved. Despite being for television, this is a real down and dirty dig. I flew through two entire seasons in a weekend. Fortunately, there are some 20 seasons and various specials.
One person found this helpful
Paige CunninghamReviewed in the United States on October 7, 2020
4.0 out of 5 stars
Some wrong episode titles/order
Excellent series, but some of the actual episodes are out of order and thus have the wrong titles. For instance, in season 11 the episode currently listed as episode 9 King Cnut's Manor is actually episode 13 "Brimming with Remains". This problem occurs sporadically across multiple seasons.
One person found this helpful
Sam is mad.Reviewed in the United States on November 24, 2019
5.0 out of 5 stars
Best archaeology show ever created.
This is, far and away, one of my favorite series ever. I ran into it completely by accident on another site and have watched every season all the way through a dozen times. The personalities are great. Robin Bush (RIP) and the theatrical readings of old texts. Phil's goofy yet cranky approach to digs. Mick's (RIP) sweaters! And let's not forget about Victor's amazing art and Tony's all out love for history. It's all here. Even the later seasons which get a lot of guff are better than any other show out there like this. I can't recommend this show enough.

Now we just need to figure out why 6+ seasons are missing on Amazon.
17 people found this helpful
kt1Reviewed in the United States on August 19, 2021
1.0 out of 5 stars
Ruined by IMDB...
This is a GREAT series, which has unfortunately been ruined by IMDB hijacking it and saturating it with commercials.

Will never watch it again. Nor any other IMDB-owned program. Ever.
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