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  • 10
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Answer:
The AX3000 that Walmart sells is different than the AX50. They both Support Wifi 6. Major difference is that the AX50 has one USB 3.0 and HomeCare Antivirus support. The AX3000 only has USB 2.0. Everything else is the same from the specs.

I don't have or use a central backup drive, so the USB isn't important to me. … see more
The AX3000 that Walmart sells is different than the AX50. They both Support Wifi 6. Major difference is that the AX50 has one USB 3.0 and HomeCare Antivirus support. The AX3000 only has USB 2.0. Everything else is the same from the specs.

I don't have or use a central backup drive, so the USB isn't important to me. My Walmart had it on sale and I paid $73.10 out the door. Best deal for what it's for. It can handle 10+ devices on my network plus a WiFi extender. see less
The AX3000 that Walmart sells is different than the AX50. They both Support Wifi 6. Major difference is that the AX50 has one USB 3.0 and HomeCare Antivirus support. The AX3000 only has USB 2.0. Everything else is the same from the specs.

I don't have or use a central backup drive, so the USB isn't important to me. My Walmart had it on sale and I paid $73.10 out the door. Best deal for what it's for. It can handle 10+ devices on my network plus a WiFi extender.

Mario V.
· May 24, 2020
  • 7
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We have two AX3000 models. The Archer AX50 has USB 3.0 the Archer AX3000 has USB 2.0.
TP-LINK Support Force
Manufacturer · January 16, 2020
  • 7
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Answer:
Apparently the "official" answer is no. BUT, if you connect two of these via wired Ethernet cables (back-haul) then they will give you what most folks think of as a mesh. I have two of these to cover a 2800 SqFt ranch house, both connected to a gigabit switch which is connected to the main router at the service demar… see more Apparently the "official" answer is no. BUT, if you connect two of these via wired Ethernet cables (back-haul) then they will give you what most folks think of as a mesh. I have two of these to cover a 2800 SqFt ranch house, both connected to a gigabit switch which is connected to the main router at the service demarc. I setup each of them as Access Points (AP) in the "System/Operation Mode" section and made the SSID the same on both. Then I turned on their Smart Connect feature. Now I have just a single SSID for the whole house that is for both 2.4 & 5ghz WiFi bands. My iPhone and Laptop connect to the strongest signal as I move around the house. I have not noticed it switching, I have to look at the "Network Map/Clients" section on the AP to see that it had moved. A true mesh wouldn't require the Ethernet back-haul, but for me the hard wired back-haul is perfect. This router offers up something called "One Mesh" but it looks like a kludge as the other device needs to be an extender/repeater. And repeaters usually drop the speed by 1/2 for each hop. see less Apparently the "official" answer is no. BUT, if you connect two of these via wired Ethernet cables (back-haul) then they will give you what most folks think of as a mesh. I have two of these to cover a 2800 SqFt ranch house, both connected to a gigabit switch which is connected to the main router at the service demarc. I setup each of them as Access Points (AP) in the "System/Operation Mode" section and made the SSID the same on both. Then I turned on their Smart Connect feature. Now I have just a single SSID for the whole house that is for both 2.4 & 5ghz WiFi bands. My iPhone and Laptop connect to the strongest signal as I move around the house. I have not noticed it switching, I have to look at the "Network Map/Clients" section on the AP to see that it had moved. A true mesh wouldn't require the Ethernet back-haul, but for me the hard wired back-haul is perfect. This router offers up something called "One Mesh" but it looks like a kludge as the other device needs to be an extender/repeater. And repeaters usually drop the speed by 1/2 for each hop.
BigBill
· January 28, 2022
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I wanted the ax6000 just cuz it had more physical ports which i kinda needed. It's been awesome I CAN say that. I have a bunch of smart devices and several streaming devices. My phone is capable of wifi 6 and can get near 1000mbs... so definitely a nice router yet much more reasonably priced compared to the other brands.
Allan B.
· April 18, 2020
  • 2
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Answer:
Yes, the router has a dedicated Access Point Mode operation function that can be conveniently configured via the TP-Link Tether app or via a web browser.
TP-LINK Support Force
Manufacturer · January 7, 2022
  • 1
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Answer:
Yes, our WiFi extenders are universally compatible with WiFi routers.
TP-LINK Support Force
Manufacturer · January 15, 2021
  • 1
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Answer:
This model supports 802.11w protected management frames.
John
· September 9, 2020
  • 1
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Answer:
your internet signal controls your speed.
The router is strictly the distributor of that signal.
So if that signal is say 10mb, then the router can only distribute 10mbs, however the wifi6 signal throughout will be fast. … see more
your internet signal controls your speed.
The router is strictly the distributor of that signal.
So if that signal is say 10mb, then the router can only distribute 10mbs, however the wifi6 signal throughout will be fast.
Routers are the middleware between modems and devices.
think of it like water from a hose, the nozzle is like the router. You can have a fine spray or a straight spray, but the amount of water is the same. see less
your internet signal controls your speed.
The router is strictly the distributor of that signal.
So if that signal is say 10mb, then the router can only distribute 10mbs, however the wifi6 signal throughout will be fast.
Routers are the middleware between modems and devices.
think of it like water from a hose, the nozzle is like the router. You can have a fine spray or a straight spray, but the amount of water is the same.

Marinpcguy
· January 2, 2022
  • 1
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Answer:
You can probably do a bridging that can bypass their built in Wi-Fi.And use this unit.I've done on their older units.and worked better than the internal Wi-Fi of their 2 in 1 modem/router.Now if you have CenturyLink's 5 yr old system you should upgrade to their 3.1 docsis system some area's dont have fiber optic yet.W/… see more You can probably do a bridging that can bypass their built in Wi-Fi.And use this unit.I've done on their older units.and worked better than the internal Wi-Fi of their 2 in 1 modem/router.Now if you have CenturyLink's 5 yr old system you should upgrade to their 3.1 docsis system some area's dont have fiber optic yet.W/CenturyLink.Cox will give you a free Arris Modem to upgrade just add landline phone to your account.Gigablast for $114 a month deal i got. see less You can probably do a bridging that can bypass their built in Wi-Fi.And use this unit.I've done on their older units.and worked better than the internal Wi-Fi of their 2 in 1 modem/router.Now if you have CenturyLink's 5 yr old system you should upgrade to their 3.1 docsis system some area's dont have fiber optic yet.W/CenturyLink.Cox will give you a free Arris Modem to upgrade just add landline phone to your account.Gigablast for $114 a month deal i got.
K. Kenneth
· January 8, 2022
  • 1
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    votes
Answer:
If your router has a wired Ethernet connection (which it should) then yes. Since you have a router already you plug the Ethernet cable into the blue port of that WiFi router and set it up in Access Point Mode. You do that in System -> Operation Mode. I have a dual WAN Cisco router, that connects to a Gigabit Switch… see more If your router has a wired Ethernet connection (which it should) then yes. Since you have a router already you plug the Ethernet cable into the blue port of that WiFi router and set it up in Access Point Mode. You do that in System -> Operation Mode. I have a dual WAN Cisco router, that connects to a Gigabit Switch, then two Ethernet cables connect to two of these WiFi (AX55) devices in different parts of the house, both setup with the same SSID and both having Smart Connect turned on. Its then a Mesh with Ethernet Backhaul to the internet. see less If your router has a wired Ethernet connection (which it should) then yes. Since you have a router already you plug the Ethernet cable into the blue port of that WiFi router and set it up in Access Point Mode. You do that in System -> Operation Mode. I have a dual WAN Cisco router, that connects to a Gigabit Switch, then two Ethernet cables connect to two of these WiFi (AX55) devices in different parts of the house, both setup with the same SSID and both having Smart Connect turned on. Its then a Mesh with Ethernet Backhaul to the internet.
BigBill
· January 29, 2022