Customer Review

Reviewed in the United States on January 23, 2020
UPDATE: Well...I was wrong about this wireless charger and I'm increasing my overall rating to 5 stars. I left my original review below. According to the Wireless Power Consortium, this device was said to be capped at 5watts for iOS devices and I based much of my review on that assessment. Tozo reached out to me and asked if I would be willing to use a Digital USB Tester for their product and assess it myself instead of relying on the Wireless Power Consortium assessment. I told them I would and they sent me the following USB tester sold on Amazon here:
https://www.amazon.com/MakerHawk-Multimeter-Impedance-Temperature-Voltmeter/dp/B07DCTG6LH

This tester documentation said it automatically senses the input and output direction of current. The male USB-C end is labeled "input" and female end is labeled "output". I tried it both with the male end plugged into the W1 and with the male end plugged into the AC adapter. Both readings on the tester were consistent.

I used several different USB-C AC adapters, including a 20w from Tozo which I like a lot. All the adapters I used were 20w or over. I also used a several different 100w-rated USB-C cables. You don't need a 100w-rated USB-C cable for the W1 but that is what I used. Despite what the Wireless Power Consortium says, Tozo is right (and my prior review was wrong): This charger easily hits 7.5w of fast charging power on my iPhone 13 Pro Max. In fact, I was able to see fast-charging over 10w at times (see attached). It is important to note that iPhones do not always invoke fast charging. iPhones are hard-coded to stop fast charging once the battery reaches 80%. To be sure I was assessing the W1's full potential, I checked charging power at various battery capacities, though all were under 50%.

In my prior review, I said this would "be perfect if it performed as advertised". It does perform as advertised and it is perfect in my opinion; both aesthetically and functionally. 5 Stars.

ORIGINAL REVIEW:
Sorry TOZO, but your page is no longer accurate. According to the Wireless Power Consortium, this product has the Qi Registration ID of 8123. Unfortunately for iOS users, the W1 uses the Basic Power Profile. What does that mean? Well, it becomes very important which power profile a device uses after iOS 13.1. If a device uses the Basic Power Profile, charging is capped at 5 watts for iOS devices (not 7.5 watts). To charge at 7.5 watts, a device must use the Extended Power Profile, which this device does not have. How do I know? Qi devices register with the Wireless Power Consortium. I can't post a URL in a review but you can guess the website from the name. Click on the Product Database and enter 8123 for this product. There you can see it uses the Basic Power Profile and it is capped at 5 watts.

Functionally, this is a very nicely designed charger. It has a nice clean look and is one of the thinnest. It works as advertised with green and blue LEDs that cast a very nice illumination through the semi-circular 'windows' in the black tint on each side of the device. It would probably be perfect if it performed as advertised. However, it will not achieve the 7.5 watt charging rate it claims. After iOS 13.1, all devices that use the Basic Power Profile are capped at 5 watts. Since the charging speed could be overlooked if you aren't measuring it, I thought it important to point that out for iOS users. I bought this specifically for the fast charging feature that was advertised in this slim, nicely designed device. Since it definitely does not have fast charging capability for iOS devices, I'm giving it 1 star.

Also, as of this review, Amazon bestows the "Amazon's Choice" designation for this device. This is despite the fact that the product page is not factually accurate. Again, as of this review, there is a large image that says, "7.5 Watt Fast Charge Mode for iPhone Series". That is not accurate for this device. I even reached out to the Wireless Power Consortium for clarification on this specific product and this is what they said:

"We maintain the Qi wireless power standard and we operate a testing and certification program. You see that we certified the product at 5W. It is a common problem that manufacturers claim more power than they really deliver. The Wireless Power Consortium cannot prevent that."

The bottom line here is that if charging your iOS device using a fast charge rate using 7.5 watts is a priority, this device cannot do that. You will need devices that have the Extended Power Profile. I won't comment on Android devices but encourage those with Android devices to do their research since if the Wireless Power Consortium states this device is capped at 5W independent of the software ecosystem, I wonder how it could be higher for Android.
Customer image
5.0 out of 5 stars Well...I was wrong about this charger
Reviewed in the United States on January 23, 2020
UPDATE: Well...I was wrong about this wireless charger and I'm increasing my overall rating to 5 stars. I left my original review below. According to the Wireless Power Consortium, this device was said to be capped at 5watts for iOS devices and I based much of my review on that assessment. Tozo reached out to me and asked if I would be willing to use a Digital USB Tester for their product and assess it myself instead of relying on the Wireless Power Consortium assessment. I told them I would and they sent me the following USB tester sold on Amazon here:
https://www.amazon.com/MakerHawk-Multimeter-Impedance-Temperature-Voltmeter/dp/B07DCTG6LH

This tester documentation said it automatically senses the input and output direction of current. The male USB-C end is labeled "input" and female end is labeled "output". I tried it both with the male end plugged into the W1 and with the male end plugged into the AC adapter. Both readings on the tester were consistent.

I used several different USB-C AC adapters, including a 20w from Tozo which I like a lot. All the adapters I used were 20w or over. I also used a several different 100w-rated USB-C cables. You don't need a 100w-rated USB-C cable for the W1 but that is what I used. Despite what the Wireless Power Consortium says, Tozo is right (and my prior review was wrong): This charger easily hits 7.5w of fast charging power on my iPhone 13 Pro Max. In fact, I was able to see fast-charging over 10w at times (see attached). It is important to note that iPhones do not always invoke fast charging. iPhones are hard-coded to stop fast charging once the battery reaches 80%. To be sure I was assessing the W1's full potential, I checked charging power at various battery capacities, though all were under 50%.

In my prior review, I said this would "be perfect if it performed as advertised". It does perform as advertised and it is perfect in my opinion; both aesthetically and functionally. 5 Stars.

ORIGINAL REVIEW:
Sorry TOZO, but your page is no longer accurate. According to the Wireless Power Consortium, this product has the Qi Registration ID of 8123. Unfortunately for iOS users, the W1 uses the Basic Power Profile. What does that mean? Well, it becomes very important which power profile a device uses after iOS 13.1. If a device uses the Basic Power Profile, charging is capped at 5 watts for iOS devices (not 7.5 watts). To charge at 7.5 watts, a device must use the Extended Power Profile, which this device does not have. How do I know? Qi devices register with the Wireless Power Consortium. I can't post a URL in a review but you can guess the website from the name. Click on the Product Database and enter 8123 for this product. There you can see it uses the Basic Power Profile and it is capped at 5 watts.

Functionally, this is a very nicely designed charger. It has a nice clean look and is one of the thinnest. It works as advertised with green and blue LEDs that cast a very nice illumination through the semi-circular 'windows' in the black tint on each side of the device. It would probably be perfect if it performed as advertised. However, it will not achieve the 7.5 watt charging rate it claims. After iOS 13.1, all devices that use the Basic Power Profile are capped at 5 watts. Since the charging speed could be overlooked if you aren't measuring it, I thought it important to point that out for iOS users. I bought this specifically for the fast charging feature that was advertised in this slim, nicely designed device. Since it definitely does not have fast charging capability for iOS devices, I'm giving it 1 star.

Also, as of this review, Amazon bestows the "Amazon's Choice" designation for this device. This is despite the fact that the product page is not factually accurate. Again, as of this review, there is a large image that says, "7.5 Watt Fast Charge Mode for iPhone Series". That is not accurate for this device. I even reached out to the Wireless Power Consortium for clarification on this specific product and this is what they said:

"We maintain the Qi wireless power standard and we operate a testing and certification program. You see that we certified the product at 5W. It is a common problem that manufacturers claim more power than they really deliver. The Wireless Power Consortium cannot prevent that."

The bottom line here is that if charging your iOS device using a fast charge rate using 7.5 watts is a priority, this device cannot do that. You will need devices that have the Extended Power Profile. I won't comment on Android devices but encourage those with Android devices to do their research since if the Wireless Power Consortium states this device is capped at 5W independent of the software ecosystem, I wonder how it could be higher for Android.
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