Customer Review

Reviewed in the United States on January 21, 2021
I read the reviews before buying this piece of ...mouse. I splurged and got this high-end mouse under the assumption it would last me years since the $15 wireless optical mice I had been using always lasted me a few years. Boy, was I wrong. So here's the skinny from a guy with an advanced degree in computer science from MIT...

Battery Life: It sucks. Plain and simple. This is a rechargeable mouse, and in the past 30-days, I have had to recharge it about once every 5-to-6 days. Normally, a single AA battery will last months, if not a year or more. Not so with this battery-eating beast.

Design Flaw: The so-called "Gesture Button" The button is hidden under the left thumb and should be named the-button-that-freezes-your-mouse-cursor-and-keeps-you-from-doing-anything-else-until-you-replace-the-mouse-button. The good news is that you can fix this problem yourself.

The problem resides in the gesture button. When you use the gesture button, a small plastic bump will push a little microswitch. As the mouse gets older, this plastic bump can get stuck in the microswitch. The microswitch gets stuck, and it doesn’t release itself anymore. I have circled the hidden button in red in my photo.

When I googled about this problem, I found out that I’m not alone with this problem as there are literally hundreds of online complaints about this problem, and it is well-known to Logitech, although they try to play dumb about it. There are two solutions offered.

1- Open the mouse. Cut the cable to the gesture button and close the mouse again. You can’t use this button anymore.
2- Open the mouse. Loosen the screws of the gesture button and close the mouse again. This will move the microswitch a few micrometers so the button work again.

I’m not too fond of the first solution. That solution is destroying a helpful function on an expensive mouse. Solution two didn’t help. This is not the first time that I opened my mouse. I already opened the mouse and adjusted the screw of the gesture button. This solution is not a permanent solution. It just postpones the problem for a couple of months.

Opening the mouse can be a littlest tricky. You have to remove six screws. Two are visible. Four are hidden under the black Teflon sliding pads. You can remove the sliding pads carefully so you can stick them back later. I don’t want to be bothered with saving the sliding pads. For three dollars, I bought a set of new pads. Please be careful. There is a flat cable between the two plastic parts of the mouse. If you don’t open the mouse carefully, you can rip this cable.

The problem is that on the plastic button is a small plastic bump. With a razor blade or a small cutting nipper, I cut away this bump. Although it is unnecessary, I wanted to have a responsive button without too much travel, so I decided to fill the space that the absence of the little bump gave me. I cut a small rectangle out of one of the Teflon sliding pads. That one is now sticking between the button and the microswitch.

My mouse is working again, and it beats trying to do an exchange with Logitech, whose off-shore customer service reps will have you beating yourselves in the head with a hammer so that you can see how good it feels when you stop.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Absolute Junk
Reviewed in the United States on January 21, 2021
I read the reviews before buying this piece of ...mouse. I splurged and got this high-end mouse under the assumption it would last me years since the $15 wireless optical mice I had been using always lasted me a few years. Boy, was I wrong. So here's the skinny from a guy with an advanced degree in computer science from MIT...

Battery Life: It sucks. Plain and simple. This is a rechargeable mouse, and in the past 30-days, I have had to recharge it about once every 5-to-6 days. Normally, a single AA battery will last months, if not a year or more. Not so with this battery-eating beast.

Design Flaw: The so-called "Gesture Button" The button is hidden under the left thumb and should be named the-button-that-freezes-your-mouse-cursor-and-keeps-you-from-doing-anything-else-until-you-replace-the-mouse-button. The good news is that you can fix this problem yourself.

The problem resides in the gesture button. When you use the gesture button, a small plastic bump will push a little microswitch. As the mouse gets older, this plastic bump can get stuck in the microswitch. The microswitch gets stuck, and it doesn’t release itself anymore. I have circled the hidden button in red in my photo.

When I googled about this problem, I found out that I’m not alone with this problem as there are literally hundreds of online complaints about this problem, and it is well-known to Logitech, although they try to play dumb about it. There are two solutions offered.

1- Open the mouse. Cut the cable to the gesture button and close the mouse again. You can’t use this button anymore.
2- Open the mouse. Loosen the screws of the gesture button and close the mouse again. This will move the microswitch a few micrometers so the button work again.

I’m not too fond of the first solution. That solution is destroying a helpful function on an expensive mouse. Solution two didn’t help. This is not the first time that I opened my mouse. I already opened the mouse and adjusted the screw of the gesture button. This solution is not a permanent solution. It just postpones the problem for a couple of months.

Opening the mouse can be a littlest tricky. You have to remove six screws. Two are visible. Four are hidden under the black Teflon sliding pads. You can remove the sliding pads carefully so you can stick them back later. I don’t want to be bothered with saving the sliding pads. For three dollars, I bought a set of new pads. Please be careful. There is a flat cable between the two plastic parts of the mouse. If you don’t open the mouse carefully, you can rip this cable.

The problem is that on the plastic button is a small plastic bump. With a razor blade or a small cutting nipper, I cut away this bump. Although it is unnecessary, I wanted to have a responsive button without too much travel, so I decided to fill the space that the absence of the little bump gave me. I cut a small rectangle out of one of the Teflon sliding pads. That one is now sticking between the button and the microswitch.

My mouse is working again, and it beats trying to do an exchange with Logitech, whose off-shore customer service reps will have you beating yourselves in the head with a hammer so that you can see how good it feels when you stop.
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